Hey there!

How are you doing today? Thanks for all of your comments on Monday’s fall-inspired smoothies post. It sounds like everyone’s getting their fair share of pumpkin this month! This week’s new things don’t have anything to do with pumpkin, but don’t worry because I’ll have plenty coming up in future weeks. In the meantime….

1. Recipe of the Week. Get ready for a little 2-for-1 action, friends. Have you ever created something in your kitchen that was so good, it made you want to shout it out from the rooftop? This recipe was one of those. It began with this dressing:

oil free sweet ginger dressing

Totally oil-free and made with a blend of chickpeas, garlic, and a huge chunk of ginger, it’s quickly becoming my favourite dressing. I adore ginger because it has a whole load of health benefits – it’s a natural anti-inflammatory so it helps to soothe achey muscles and joint pain, but it also helps to ease an upset stomach and headaches. It’s also a bazillion times better than ground ginger in my opinion, and its flavour certainly shines through here.

oil free sweet ginger dressing

But what should you use  this dressing in? Stir fried dishes and salads are obvious choices, but my favourite so far is an Edamame and Quinoa Collard Wrap.

Edamame and Quinoa Collard Wrap with Sweet Ginger Dressing

Not only are these wraps absolute beauties to look at, but they’re full of nutrition. I love how sturdy collard greens are (without being so tough that you have to gnaw away at them!) and they do a great job of holding all the fillings. Simply layer a couple on top of each other, then arrange the quinoa, edamame, and veggies in a line. I stirred a bit of the ginger dressing into the cooked quinoa, and drizzled a bit more on top of all the veggies because it’s just THAT delicious. To wrap them up, all you need to do is fold in the sides, then roll the leaves away from you. Easy peasy, and no drips!

Edamame and Quinoa Collard Wrap with Sweet Ginger Dressing

Click here for the recipe!

Edamame and Quinoa Collard Wrap with Sweet Ginger Dressing

2. Yellow pitaya… also known as a yellow dragon fruit.

yellow dragonfruit

Doesn’t it look cool? I spotted this little guy at Zehrs on the weekend and figured I had to try it out. I first tried dragonfruit about 2 years ago, but it was the more conventional looking, larger pink kind. The yellow dragon fruit, also known as a pitaya, is just another species in the family.

yellow dragonfruit

Dragon fruits come from a type of cactus, which according to Wikipedia, grows in Mexico, Central America, South America, East Asia and Southeast Asia,  Okinawa, Hawaii, Israel, northern Australia, and southern China (so they’re really not as rare as I thought!)

yellow dragonfruit

From a nutritional standpoint, here’s the super quick summary:

  • The flesh is white, creamy, and mild in taste with edible black seeds
  • The skin isn’t edible, but the flesh can easily be scooped out of it when the fruit is ripe
  • The seeds are rich in healthy fats and are only digestible if you chew them
  • They’re a rich source of phosphorous, vitamin C, iron and calcium

I learned that there are all sorts of things that can be done with dragon fruit, including steeping its flowers for tea, converting the juices into wine,  and using to flavour drinks. For this particular trial I didn’t have time to do anything fancy so I simply ate it raw with my breakfast smoothie yesterday morning.

yellow dragonfruit

Taste-wise, the flesh was super mild. It seemed a bit sweeter than I remember the flesh of a red dragon fruit being, but still not very flavourful. Even though it was a bit underwhelming on its own, I think it would add a lot of creaminess to a smoothie, so if I decide to spend three more dollars on another one, that’s how I’d use it.

yellow dragonfruit

Now I want you to tell me…

  • Did you try anything new yesterday?
  • What’s the most exotic fruit or vegetable you’ve tried recently?